Thrift Like Me

This blog, with its plethora of topics, has turned into a sort of “look what I got” brag-bag.  It is what it is.

Granted, I feel like I have every right to brag about some of my amazing finds that have come from the dusty and disorganized racks at thrift stores.  And I only do it in hopes of inspiring others to go on a treasure hunt, save a lot of money, and more importantly, express their creativity while becoming greener citizens.  Yes, thrifting is so eco-friendly!

Anyways, I thought I’d share some more wisdom on what I do and how I do it.  Friends and family are always asking me, “How do you find these amazing things at thrift stores?”  Well readers…here you go!

The scanning method.

It is easy to get overwhelmed by the quantity and underwhelmed by the quality of items in a second-hand store.  After becoming a serious thrifter, I’ve developed a technique for going through the racks quickly.

a) Quickly look at tag

b) Look at the garment to see if you like it

c) Check size

d) Check for any damage/flaws

I am also going to suggest that you smell the item.  I know that sounds funky.  But do it.  Thrift-stores usually “sanitize” clothing.  Which basically means they spray the same stuff on clothes/fabrics that the bowling alleys spray into rented bowling shoes.  But this doesn’t mean that some smells from the previous owner don’t linger.  The most common is cigarette smoke (yuck!), which is hard to get out in the wash.

 Cleaning.

Find a cheap $2-any-item dry cleaner.  You will be using it for all the things you buy that can’t be washed.

For everything else, I suggest hot water and bleach for whites or buy the bleach for colors.  For people grossed out by second-hand clothes, just think, the clothes you buy at the department store are not really that different.  I worked at a clothing retail store once, and every night we would throw a lot of stuff on the unclean floor before we refolded it. People also try things on in the dressing room, leaving oils and whatever else on the clothes.  You’re going to wash it either way.

 Don’t always rely on the tag sizes.

These are my reasons why:

a) Sometimes, due to previous washing or other random factors, a large might actually look good on a person who usually wears a small.

b) A lot of today’s fashions are loose blouses and oversized sweaters.  Embrace the boho, thriftique-chic!

c) If you find a designer dress that retails for $300 for $5 and it’s just a little bit too big, a simple trip to the tailor and a $15 alteration later will still make that dress an incredible bargain.  It might even fit better after alterations than if it was in your size!

 Use other people as a resource.

Check the dressing rooms, “go back” rack, and the beginnings of racks/racks near the dressing room.

Why?

You’re not the only one who knows a good deal.  Goodwill/second-hand stores aren’t just for the low-income anymore.  People like the “thrill of the chase”, and you will see all sorts of bargain hunters, thrifters, and fashionistas in second-hand stores nowadays.  For many, like myself, it’s a hobby or a passion we just can’t get enough of.  So, while we all would like to say we found that awesome designer shirt hidden between a grungy t-shirt and grandma’s blouse, it’s likely that someone else has gone through the racks thoroughly and pulled some amazing finds.  Maybe they pulled a fantastic shirt that didn’t fit so they either put it on the “go back” rack, or, if they were lazy, left it in the dressing room.

Consider location.

In some instances, I’ve found that the quality of merchandise at thrift stores directly correlates to the location.  For example, the Goodwill in Williamsburg, Virginia, has the best selection of designer clothes, and clothes that appeal to a younger crowd.  Perhaps this is because the College of William & Mary is a few blocks away.  Maybe this store is filled by student donations.

 Deals & Discounts.

Get in the know about how you can save even more money!

  1. Goodwill donation punch card (Central Virginia and Tidewater Goodwill stores) – you get a punch for every donation.  When you reach 4 donations, you get %20 off your purchase.
  2. Student ID discount – The Goodwill in Williamsburg, Virginia has a %20 off the entire purchase if you show a student ID.
  3. Goodwill tag “color” discount (Central Virginia and Tidewater Goodwill stores) – Every week, a certain tag color (usually that of older items) is 50% off
  4. Discounts on certain days (Northern Virginia Goodwill stores) – Customer Appreciation day is Tuesday.  All clothing is %25 off.
  5. Discounts for items that have been in the store too long 
  6. Frequent shopper discounts
  7. Coupons on store website
  8. Discounts for seniors 

 Wear clothes that you can try clothes on over.

Some thrift stores have dressing rooms.  Some don’t.  That’s just how it goes.  Most Goodwill and Salvation Army stores have them, but I’ve found the Value Village stores do not.  If you’re shopping for skirts or dresses, wear leggings or tights.  If you’re in the market for a new shirt, wear a tank top.  Don’t be bashful to try things on over your clothes in the middle of the store.

 Make friends with the employees.

Ask what days they get shipments in so you’re first in line to see all the new merchandise.

And the most important…Prepare to spend the time (I suggest 1-2 hours).

I was in a Goodwill one day when a group of twenty-something girls walked in.  They were shopping next to me, and I overheard one girl say: “I don’t understand how anyone finds anything at Goodwill.  This stuff is all ugly.”  True.  A lot of it is ugly.  I probably wouldn’t wear about 97% of the clothes in Goodwill.  But she said this as soon as she walked into the store and started looking at a rack of clothes.  If you expect to walk into a second-hand store and have that designer dress in your size sitting in front of you then you’re in the wrong business.  People ask me all the time, “How do you find all these awesome clothes?”  A large part of what I do involves patience and dedication.  On this blog, you get to see all the awesome things I find second-hand shopping.  But what you don’t see are the hours I spend in a store going through each and every item of clothing or whatever else I’m looking for that day.  I might spend 3 hours in a store only to find one shirt I like. And, it’s dirty work.  I’ve had allergy attacks in dusty thrift stores.  I’ve sweated my butt of in non-airconditioned ones.

I hope my suggestions help in your thrifting adventures.  And as always, please feel free to ask any questions or leave comments!  I’d love to hear your thoughts 🙂

 Happy Thrifting! 

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My Idea of a Goodwill Time

A question to my fellow thrifty bloggers out there: “Do you ever go into a thrift store with the intention to spend about 20 minutes, but end up spending two hours?”

Well I do.

And I usually don’t leave until a) I’ve looked through all the racks, b) I have to be somewhere, or c) I have to pee.  Usually it’s C.

I recently spent about two hours at the Goodwill located at 701 East Broad Street in Richmond, Virginia.  I was in a really good mood; just had an awesome workout and a great pho lunch at Pho 79 (see picture) and my proximity to the Goodwill meant I just had to stop by since I hadn’t visited this one in over a year.

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Pho with all the yummy bits like tripe and tendon. No filter. Who wouldn’t want to go shopping after this goodness?

This particular Goodwill does an awesome job at sorting everything by type and color.  And the sales associate could not be friendlier.  Seriously.  She made positive comments on everything I bought.  It made my day.  I actually felt like…validated that I am good at this little hobby of mine.

Anyways, those two hours were very productive, clothing-wise!  And I probably would have spent more than two hours, had I not had to use the restroom.  Ah that’s life, I guess!

This summer, I’ve been on the hunt for long, flowing skirts.  I get on “item of clothing” kicks, and it’s recently been skirts.  I also love the bohemian look that you can really pull off with long skirts, plus they are so comfortable.  Like honestly, would you rather wear crotch digging shorts and have your legs stick to everything you sit on in this humid Virginia heat, or would you want a nice long skirt that is made of light fabric and is super airy and cool.  Is that even a question?

My first outfit du jour is made up of a turquoise printed peasant skirt I got for $4.99 from this Goodwill trip.  Yes, $4.99 is a little steep for second-hand prices, but I loved the print and colors, and it looked like it had barely been worn.

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Turquoise Peasant Skirt $4.99, White J.Crew Lace Top $1.98

The fabric was so light and airy, and I’m really going for that right now.  The skirt was one of those Target brands, so I probably paid close to what it sold for on sale at Target, but I really liked it, so it was a bit of a splurge.  Oh just fyi, all the skirts at this particular Goodwill were $4.99.  The white lace 3/4 sleeve top I’ve paired with it is originally from J.Crew, which I scored for $1.98 at another Goodwill located in Northern Virginia.

I also got this lovely French Connection floral printed, A-line skirt.  %100 cotton.

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FC Floral Skirt – $2.50 and Lafayette 148 Silk Cream Top – $1.99

It was rocking the 50 percent off tag, so I scored it for $2.50.  $2.50 for French Connection.  Yep, awesome.  It’s a size 4 (I’m usually a 1), however, it has loops for a belt, so I can actually put a waist belt in and it fits really well as a high-wasted skirt without too much bunching around the waist, or it can be worn on the hips.  I may get it altered at a later point…haven’t decided yet.

I found the white/cream colored top I’ve paired it with at Goodwill for $1.99.  Can I mention this is a Lafayette 148 silk top?  I looked up similar tops by this designer and they go for $200 at retailers like Saks Fifth Avenue.  Oh my word.  At the time, I only thought they retailed for like $60; so I decided to not get another Lafayette 148 top on the rack because it was a size 2 and way too big, but I should have bought it for my mom or a friend, or somebody…thrifter fail.

This awesome, elegant, couture purple skirt was bought for $2.50.

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Purple Long Skirt – $2.50…I feel so elegant!

It was probably handmade as there were no tags, however, handmade = couture.  Yes, don’t argue with me, it is.  It fits my waist perfecto-ly!

And there is so much love for this $4.99 white pencil skirt when paired with the black lace Banana Republic top also worn above that I got on final sale at BR for $12.  And a borrowed gold belt from the mother.  This love is just too, too much.

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White Pencil Skirt – $4.99. Oh look at me trying to primp…

It was a great trip that my mom gave me a little grief for after learning I spent two hours there.  Her nagging – “Paula, are you a hoarder?!” was on repeat when I got home.  This was until I presented her with a very like-new Banana Republic salmon colored silk dress that I bought her for $6.99.

No complaints after that.

 Happy Thrifting!

Thrifty Fashionista

Being a conservative thrifter is one of my goals right now.  That’s basically my pretty sounding language for trying to not be a hoarder.  Thrifting = good! Hoarding = not good.  I watch those hoarding shows and those people just do the thrift store thing all wrong.  Don’t be like them.

So it’s not that I absolutely need more clothes, but when you can get a cute skirt for $2…not a hoarder. Not a hoarder.

I’d like to think of myself as a thrifty fashionista.  That is, I look at current trends and try to replicate them with what I can find in a thrift store.  It’s kind of insane how styles come back to life after a few years.  After we’ve given “clothing item X” away, the fashion magazines come out with celebrities wearing “clothing item X” that costs lots.  I know I’ll soon be on the hunt for some high-wasted jeans I can make into shorts, since those are popping up everywhere!

Anyways, I know, and the fashion gods seem to agree, that long, flowing skirts – the maxi skirt – are perfect for this summer!  Whether they are solid or printed, you can dress them up with a nice top and fancy jewelry for a special evening, or throw on a tank top and some flats for a casual day.

I’ve seen maxi skirts selling for a lot of dollars (as in like $80 – that’s just way to much money for this post-grad) at stores like Zara.  Click on the link to see a picture of said skirt that I can find a (and you can too!) practically identical version of at a thrift store.  I’d show you a picture, but I don’t know how all that copyright stuff goes/it’s easier to link it/I’m a little lazy today.

Or long floral skirts at American Apparel for $45.  Is it just me, or have I seen this skirt in many thrift stores before?  And maybe this is my personal opinion, but this skirt ain’t that cute/I’d maybe pay $2 for it.  Definitely not $45.  That is positivo.

What do you think of the long maxi skirt summer trend?  I love it because a) it’s comfy and cool and b) you don’t have to worry about shaving your legs every single freaking day during the summer.  Double score.

Recently, I got this awesome borderline vintage beige with black floral accents maxi skirt from the Salvation Army Thrift store in Richmond, Virginia for around $3.75.  It was originally $7.49, but the tag color noted it was 50 percent off that day!  Score.

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Beige Skirt with Black Floral Accents $3.75, Banana Republic Shirt $1.98, Purple Gem Necklace – borrowed from Mom’s costume jewelry
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Floral on the skirt, floral on the walls…

I also found a super cute red printed high wasted skirt.  It’s got a bunch of horizontal line patterns of a variety of colors.  Kind of tribal looking, which I know is in style right now. And %100 cotton.  Love me some natural fabrics.  The waste-line was really tiny, which is hard to find at second-hand stores.  The best part, it was $2.49, also 50 percent off!  So I got this skirt for $1.25.

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Red Vintage Print High-wasted Skirt $1.25, Banana Republic Shirt $1.98, Gold Waist Belt – borrowed, but also thrifted, Vintage Purple Gem Necklace – borrowed

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I should also mention that I found the top, which is a fitted, stretchy top with gold glittery specs (it’s hard to see in the picture) at a Goodwill store in Arlington, Virginia.  It was Banana Republic and this particular store had all their short sleeve non-print shirts at $1.98.

I also got this cute blue top, which is Gap, I believe, for $2.25 at Diversity Thrift in Richmond.  The orange sweater, that I wear a lot, wasn’t from a thrift store, but it was from a J.Crew warehouse sale, so that’s kind of being thrifty!

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Blue Tie Top $2.25, Orange J.Crew Sweater – gift, but purchased at J.Crew warehouse sale

What neat summer fashion trends have you discovered thrifting?  Is there anything I should be on the lookout for that’s coming back in style?  I would love to know 🙂

Happy Thrifting!

Twenty-Five Dollars

I’ve (only) got twenty dollars in my pocket.

No, really, I do.  That’s it.

It’s been a while since I’ve been thrifting, and just as long since I’ve done a related post.  So, first off, I want to thank my fellow thrifty bloggers that follow me for my second-hand content for their patience.  It’s been difficult to find time to thrift with most of my time spent staring at a computer screen at my desk job that I enjoy so, so much (sarcasm? can you hear it?), and sitting in traffic for hours on my daily commute picking my nose and watching other people pick their noses.  Okay, I don’t really pick my nose, but you get what I mean.

I’m also poor and trying not to depend on my parents for support.  Not like, living on the streets poor, but not able to spend $40 on anything besides food, gas, rent and bills right now.  Living in DC is expensive and it sucks every dollar out of me.  And why do they charge more for things up here?  Because they can.  That’s why.

And as much as I love thrifting, I need to limit the amount of material items I accumulate right now.  I’m thinking about going abroad to teach English at some point in the near future.  I haven’t talked about it on my blog because it’s still something I’m researching and nothing is set in stone.  However, a move like that means cutting back on purchasing things I might not necessarily need at this point in my life.

Anyways, I did have a thrifting adventure a few weeks ago with my mom at Diversity Thrift in Richmond, Virginia.  And well, she was the one with the twenty dollars in her pocket, or, in our case, the AmEx card.  I was mostly looking for clothes, because that’s actually something I can use.

And what did I get?

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Blue Cropped Blouse $2.25 (with white shorts I already had)
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NYC & Co. Orange Tunic $3

I also got a great dress jacket for work for $3 – not pictured because it’s at the dry cleaner, and a Gap light blue tank that ties in the front for $2.25.  I’ll update with pictures of these items when I can.

And then came the “Holiday Room”.  Somewhere a sign was posted with “Fill an entire basket for $3”.  Trouble?  Possibly.  Did we need more stuff?  No.  Yes.  The answer is always yes.

The most exciting part of this room is that the Diversity Thrift staff had just thrown boxes into the 8×8 ft. room without ever going through them.  So it was essentially a treasure hunt.  And for a thrifter, when you’re digging through a box and come across a smaller department store box circa 1960, you get excited.  Unfortunately, that box turned out to be bows.  But another box was filled with really neat glass Christmas ornaments.

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They came in this Harry & David box marked “pretty/interesting”
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The red and blue cracked glass are my favorite! The ones with dots are hand blown, And a UVA ornament? (Boooo) – pretty sure these all cost more than $3 at one point…

We also found some awesome 50 cent heavy duty wrapping paper.  I found this lovely pier one roll with images of SE Asia on it, which I’d love to put in a frame and make into wall art.  Ideas, ideas!

Mom also got some neat things that day, however, I can’t remember what they were.  Mom, what did you get?  I know you read this!  🙂  Thrifting has turned out to be a really fun mother-daughter thing for us!  And also, who doesn’t like getting a bargain?

I think our total bill came to $25.  We had two large paper grocery bags full of neat things.  I mean seriously, how much can you really do with $25 nowadays?

Afterwards, we went to Kitchen 64 for drinks and some yummy nachos!  Yay for mother-daughter thrifting days!

What neat items have you thrifted lately?  Do you usually go for clothes or housewares?  Does your mom (or dad) share a thrifting passion too?  Oh, and what fun things can you do for $25?

Happy Thrifting!

Update: Also for that $25, my mom got 4 name-brand dress shirts for my dad, as well as some other holiday decorations!

Mother-Daughter Thrifting

Thrifting is a huge mother-daughter bonding experience for me and my mom.  I think I got the thrifty gene from her, but, she will attest, I did not get my creative gene from her.  She mostly thrifts “cat” related items.  (Side note: We have 4 cats.  Everything in our house is cat-related.  It’s insane.)  And she doesn’t need anymore cat-things, but we all have our hoarding tendencies.  Right?  Right.

A while back, we went to the Salvation Army Family Store located at 2601 Hermitage Road in Richmond, VA.  This trip was by chance; we had planned to go to Diversity Thrift which is a few streets away from the SA, and we did, but after a disappointing selection (not totally disappointing – I got a Jones New York wool sweater and a 100% Cashmere sweater for around $7 for both) we decided to stop by the Salvation Army. (Side note: Something is wrong when a thrift store sells used Chinese take-out containers for $1, shame on you Diversity Thrift!)

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Green-ish Cashmere Sweater from Diversity Thrift – And how I feel about Mondays…

The Salvation Army store is really nice.  You almost feel like you’re in a department store.  Everything is well-organized by “type” of clothing (long sleeve blouses, short sleeve shirts, sweaters, etc.) and they weed out a lot of bad items.  Additionally, they have a large selection of gently used furniture and household appliances like washing machines, stoves and refrigerators for amazing prices.  I don’t remember the exact prices, but significantly less than buying them new.  They also had a couple of pianos for less than $100.  I can vouch, these pianos were in great shape, maybe needing a tune-up.  Not in need of a piano, but if you’re looking for a second hand piano in Richmond, this is your place!

During this trip, I was shopping for long sleeve blouses.  I think there’s a fashion trend (note “I think” – not a big fashion person!) for these flowy, blousy tops.  I’ve seen them in many stores and as much as I like them, they are often over $20 and made of that dreaded fabric – polyester.  I don’t have anything against polyester or blends – they are washable and low maintenance – but I don’t feel right paying exorbitant amounts for poly.

I’ve found that many thrift stores carry the original inspiration for this trend – silk blouses.  Sure, these might have belonged to grandma, but after a quick dry clean, they are better, cheaper alternatives.  I think they have much more “character” too!  Yay for vintage pieces!

I ended up purchasing a few blouses for about $5 each.  I’m thinking these tops were from the ’70s, but I’m not sure.  I love pairing them with leggings or skinny jeans.

Here is a lovely burnt-orange blouse with pretty embroidery:

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Vintage Silk Blouse with Embroidery & Tiffany Necklace (necklace is not from the thrift store)
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Close up of the Embroidery

Mom also bought Dad two button down shirts at the SA – one made by Vineyard Vines for $6.  I love Vineyard Vines, but they are so expensive.  I found the identical shirt online and it retails for $98.50 – Are you kidding me?!?  I’ll update with a picture of the shirt next time I’m home.  I swear, it’s the same shirt in absolute perfect condition!

The Salvation Army is a bit more expensive, but it’s so well-organized and sells quality items, so the higher prices don’t bother me.  Also, the SA has a great mission statement – the proceeds from sales go towards helping people get back on their feet from homelessness, drug addiction, etc. and provides work-training.  It is a religious-affiliated organization.

Happy Thrifting!

Euro-Thrifting in Rome

Two things I love – traveling and thrifting.  I have to admit, I didn’t really play a role in planning the Rome portion of the Europe trip since I met up my family and they booked most of our tours and side trips through the tour company with which they traveled.  I was just along for the ride.  I’m not a huge fan of tour groups, however, one of the the side-trips they booked was to a “market” that has apparently been around for hundreds of years.  Today, this “market” is basically hundred of vendors selling knock-off purses, novelty items, new clothing, cheap bras, fake jewelry and second-hand clothing/items stacked in heaps on tables, so a flea market.  Still, not many tourists were here, just Romans and the Indian vendors.  The tour group we were with wasn’t thrilled with this “market” because it was extremely crowded, pouring rain and apparently selling “junk”.  But we all know that in my eyes junk can be treasure!

Because it was pouring down rain that day, and also, I might have had a few too many drinks the night before, I wasn’t really in the mood to “search” the piles of clothes.  But when I saw a tent with a “Everything .50 euro” sign, I knew I couldn’t pass it up. Digging through the pile, I stumbled upon this chunky black and white sweater.  It is definitely a large, possibly an extra large, but I knew it could be a possibility!  I really loved the fabric (all cotton) and the way the black and white kind of fades into each other.  Plus, aren’t chunky sweaters always in style?!

My second-hand sweater (.50 euro), green skinny jeans I got on the sale rack from Target ($7), wrap around black scarf that was a gift, and Mom’s 80s broach that I “borrowed”.

Now I didn’t get to try the sweater on because it was pouring and I didn’t have anyone to hold my purse and we know pick-pocketing is very common in Rome, so I gave the yelling, angry looking man my .50 euros and was on my way.  I figured, if it ended up looking horrible it was only .50 euros, which is about 64 US cents!  My cheapest second-hand clothing purchase ever!

Upon getting back to the states, I washed it in hot water and detergent to get all the well…you know, dirt and whatever out.  Paired it with some green skinny jeans and a chunky wrap around scarf that was a gift.  I also rummaged through my mom’s jewelry box and found out she has a bunch of awesome 80s jewelry that’s obviously kind of back in style.  At least, I’m bringing it back!   I ended up borrowing a turquoise and silver broach.  I absolutely love this outfit!

I think it’s awesome that other countries value the concept of putting things to use again.  Have you ever thrifted in another country?

Value Village Fashion Finds

Recently, I spent the weekend in DC with a great friend from high school – well the high school I attended for a year.  We worked an event together on Saturday, and after the event, one of her friends suggested we go to this thrift store called Value Village – Unique Thrift Store located in Silver Spring, MD.  Apparently there are a few Value Villages in the DC area, but the one we went to had the best selection.  Value Village supports local nonprofits and charities in the area – yay!

None of us had actually been to Value Village before, so we had no idea what to expect.  When we got there we were overwhelmed!  The only way I can describe this store is a combination of a thrift store and a Big Lots.  One half of the store is second-hand items – so many racks of clothes, housewares and furniture at awesome prices!  The other side is new items at discount prices; we didn’t venture over there.

A few observations about Value Village:  So many items.  This thrift store is the size of a large department store.  The clothes are priced great and they have many brand names, but are grouped by kind, not size.  This means you will need time to search for pieces and sizes that you want.  Also, I did not see a dressing room (this doesn’t mean they don’t have one, but I personally didn’t see one), so you may have to take a gamble that the pieces will fit or try on over your clothes.  The furniture is great and well priced – I saw so many pieces that were quality wood products.  Can we say refurbish projects!?  Housewares are a little expensive, but reasonable.  They also take credit cards.

Overall, this store blew me away – great clothing and awesome furniture.  I was in thrift store heaven and probably could have spent an entire day in there!

My friends and I found designer pieces for under $5.  What a steal!

First great find – this lime-green chunky cable knit sweater.  Props to my friend Sydney for finding this one!  I will most likely wear it with skinny jeans or my favorite – black leggings.  I dry cleaned this.

Brand: Old Navy.  Second-hand Price: $3.99

Second great find – Navy blue blazer with 3/4 length sleeves.  You can’t see it in the picture, but the fabric is textured.  I will definitely be wearing this to interviews or if, fingers crossed, I get a job!  I dry cleaned this too!

Brand: Gap.  Second-hand price: $3.99.

Third great find – Vintage crossing colors loose sweater.  I absolutely love this print and the fact that something so old can still be stylish!  Able to put this in the washing machine!

Brand: James Korman by Dalton.  Second-hand price: $2.99

A bit of thrift store advice:

  • Sizes don’t always matter.  The lime-green chunky cable knit sweater was a large.  For those of you who know me, I am definitely not a large.  So I don’t know if it was a children’s large put on the adult rack, or if someone shrunk it and that’s why it ended up at the thrift store.  It fits me great.  The vintage crossing colors sweater is definitely big on me, but that’s the style now – lose and draping.
  • Check, check and check again.  People give things away for many reasons – mostly because it doesn’t fit or isn’t their style anymore.  But some items are damaged and they do end up on the racks, so triple check for rips, tears, and moth holes.  But hey, if you know how to sew and can fix something up, kudos to you!
  • You can be stylish and brands don’t always matter – if it looks good on you, you like it and you’ve seen something similar in the fashion magazines, then get it!  I feel that I can be more stylish by thrifting because certain pieces are always coming back in style.  For example, these blousy tops that are popular – don’t they kind of resemble the ones our grandmas wore to church a few years ago?  Just have an open mind, know popular styles and be creative.  Check out Madewell – I have seen these fashions in second-hand stores.  But most of all, do you!
  • You get more, but you have to search.  5 second-hand shirts for $20 or 1 new shirt for $39.99 – Which is better?
  • Check to see thrift store hours and if they take credit card.  Some are closed on certain days to inventory and smaller ones will only take cash.

So questions to you!  What great items (clothing or otherwise) have you found second-hand?! I want to know! 🙂

Happy Thrifting!