We run to overcome.

My heart absolutely breaks for the runners, volunteers and spectators in Boston yesterday.  As a runner myself, and having just finished the Monument Avenue 10k in Richmond that over 32,000 people completed, I was in disbelief that someone could be filled with such evil and selfishness to destroy a day that is supposed to be filled with happiness and celebration.

While I share, along with the rest of the world, the disbelief and sadness of these events,  I wanted to take a different route in the words I’ve decided to put here.  Instead of writing about the bad, I wanted to write about the event that this evil affected.  I want to write about the power of running.

Why do we run? 

We run to clear our heads when life gets stressful.

We run to prove to ourselves that we are capable of doing what we thought we could not.

We run to show ourselves that we can overcome.

Running takes dedication and commitment.  We lace up our shoes before the sun rises, or hit the pavement after a long day of work.  We trudge up hills and feel the sweat dripping down our faces.  It teaches us transformation through dedication.  Generally, in life, we don’t get to where we want to be overnight or without frustration, maybe even failure at first.  To experience both physical and mental transformation, a lot of diligence, persistence and patience come into play.  Success doesn’t come overnight.  Running teaches us that.

To me, running has always been a metaphor for life.  Things get tough.  We face adversity.  Last year, a few weeks before I ran the 2012 Monument Avenue 10k, I had my heart broken.  I was devastated because I had made a life with this person, and I didn’t know what direction my life was going to take without him.  But I was set on running this amazing race that over 40,000 people from all over the country and world come to participate in – a wonderful mass of humanity.  I knew that the spectators and the positive encouragement along the course would be one of the best cures for sadness.  And on mile 4, when I started to get my runner’s high, I remember telling myself that I was capable of anything.  In that moment, I could fly if I wanted to.  I didn’t need another person to make me feel some sense of worth.

Running helped, and still helps me when things get difficult.

Running teaches us resilience.  There are times we want to stop and give up.  Our minds tell us we’re through, we’re done, we’re going to pass out from fatigue.  That we are defeated.  There are days where we have sub-par runs, but we must get up tomorrow.  The sun rises and it’s a chance to begin again.  A new day; a new run.  One thing runners learn very early on is that we must be resilient, as our bodies are strong enough to keep pushing forward.  In running, and in life, we are stronger than we thought.

We can get through this.

We can get through the events of Boston, Aurora, Sandy Hook, and Virgina Tech.  We’re resilient, but we never forget.  Our lives move forward, and if anything, they move forward in a fashion where we hold the people close to us dear, where we remember to say “I love you”, where we don’t let the trivial things get to us as much.  We enjoy life.  We smile more.  We take time out to help and be there for others.  We realize, life is precious.  And simultaneously, when humanity bands together in times of turmoil, we discover, we are loved.

We also see that race events, whether it be a 5k, 10k, half-marathon, or the full 26.2 bring out the absolute best in people.

I posted this as my Facebook status yesterday, and I’ll close this post with the same thoughts:

“The thing I love most about races is the feeling of “oneness” between total strangers.  There’s so much love and support for people we don’t even know; people cheering you on with words of encouragement, giving free high fives and countless smiles that keep you pushing forward when you want to stop, when things get tough.  Running races reminds me there’s still good in the world.  There are still people on your side.  Thoughts and prayers to all the people at the Boston Marathon today.”

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6 thoughts on “We run to overcome.

  1. Such a well written, inspirational take on the terrible Boston tragedy. I run to clear my mind and do something good for myself. “We still have to get up tomorrow…” Thanks for making me go on my run today!

    • I appreciate the comment 🙂 It was the best way I knew how to address the feelings I had about it. I see you’re teaching English in Thailand – how exciting! I actually just submitted an application to teach there this fall, so fingers crossed I get accepted. I’m so afraid that my running will suffer if I move to SE Asia though – it’s so hot and humid!

      • It is really hot! I don’t run as often as I should while traveling, but when I was living in Suwannaphum, I ran quite regularly around 6pm, just when a slight breeze would come up to cool off things a bit. You’ll get used to it after a while, but that doesn’t make running any easier. Where did you apply? Did you use an agency?

        I’m happy to answer any questions you might have. Just shoot me an email on my contact page!

      • Thanks! I’m thinking about going through a recruiting program that is based in the US to put my parents at ease more 🙂 I will most definitely email you…I have lots of questions 🙂

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